silky terrier

Silky Terrier: Little Dog, Big Personality!

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‘Silkies’ as the Australian silky terrier is often referred to, is a small dog with a big, bold spirit and excitement for life. Their small size requires delicate handling and does not qualify them as guard dogs but they’ll definitely warn you to keep intruders at bay. Their personality shows typical terrier traits, obviously. Which are digging, chasing, and barking. A silky dog is loyal, intelligent, and playful who’ll be happy to join you on a hike or be a lap dog on a lazy day.

Breed Name:Silky Australian terrier
Breed Group:Toy dog, companion dog
Height:9-10 inches
Weight:8-12 pounds
Life Span: 13-15 years
Type of Coat:Long, straight, and smooth
Coat Color:Shades of blue and rich tan
Temperament: Loving, intelligent, spirited, playful, protective, sweet-natured but may get aggressive to other animals if not socialized well.
Other Names:Silkies, Australian silky terrier, and Sydney silky terrier
Grooming Needs:Moderate 
Training Needs:Moderate: short walks daily or indoor play.
Recommended Families:Big families, children, and seniors.

History

Terriers were originally bred to search for, hunt, and ward off vermin like mice, rodents, etc. Their small size enabled them to enter small openings and scare off the hidden pests into the open where they could become an easy target. Silky terriers are great at digging hence they could burrow and catch their prey faster than the prey could dig to escape.

Due to the work they were bred for, they still have a high prey drive and may escape chasing one if they are left unsupervised in an area that lacks fencing. 

Silky terrier puppies are a result of a cross between a Yorkshire terrier with native Australian terrier, originating in the 1800s, Australia. 

Silky Terrier Appearance

silky terrier

Source: dailypaws.com

Silky terrier’s size ranges from nine to ten inches tall. It may vary depending on the size of parents with males being comparatively taller than females. A silky terrier’s weight is approximately eight to twelve pounds. 

Another variety of the silky terrier is the miniature silky terrier or the teacup silky terrier. A teacup silky terrier, as the name suggests can almost fit in a teacup. The teacup or miniature silky terrier doesn’t grow up to be taller than 5 to 7 inches in height and 3-4 pounds in weight. 

The teacup silky terriers are adorable and extremely delicate but this tiny tod comes with a susceptibility to a bunch of health issues due to their extremely small size. We recommend you to get a normal-sized silky over the teacup one.

The silky terrier has straight hair that shows luster or gloss. They rock both long and short hair looks. Their mane is highlighted when they have long hair. Their coat has tan or apricot color in the facial region whereas the body shows light shades of silvery blue and conforms to the body shape.

The silky has an athletic build which shows off their hunting nature. Their ears are small and erect, with small almond-shaped eyes and a skull that is flat at the top. Their tail is fluffy and carried high. 

Another common variety of the silky terrier is the silky poo. A silky poo is the mix between a silky terrier and a poodle and shows a mix of characters between both of these breeds. They may have a silky coat with curls like that of a poodle. Other traits are quite similar with some of them being that of a poodle’s.    

Note: Other than these little obstacles that you might come across with your silky terrier, it’s all rainbows and unicorns with these pure souls that’ll just add to your life without asking for much in return. So what are you waiting for, head out and get one of these angels home.           

Silky Terrier Temperament and Personality

silky terrier

Source: facebook.com

The Australian silky terrier is active, intelligent, and playful and wouldn’t mind joining its owner on a hike. They have a loyal personality and are extremely dedicated to their owners. They are smart but have typical terrier tendencies like barking and digging which can be reduced by training them early on.

They will alert you of any strange activity or people in the surrounding area with a lot of barking, so if you aren’t prepared for that, this isn’t a dog for you. The silky terrier has a high chase drive and will go after anything and everything that moves, which demands a house with fencing or proper supervision when they are out in the open.

With proper and early socialization they warm up to other dogs, without which they may act aggressively towards other dogs. They are usually good with children and seniors and consider their humans their pack. They are very social and leaving them alone for long hours can lead to separation anxiety which can bring out excessive barking and destructive behavior. 

Silky terrier will be up for hitting the road with you rather than staying back alone. 

Silky Terrier Price

silky terrier

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A teacup silky terrier costs around 800$ to 3500$ depending on their breeding.

A silky terrier puppy price starts at 1000$  and goes up to 2000$ depending on the breeder, quality of breeding, location, and pedigree of the puppy. Champion and show breeds tend to cost more than a regular companion dog.

We suggest you first look to adopt a silky terrier puppy from your local shelters if available before you consider buying, as adoption gives the dog a second chance at a better life.

Also read : Malshi: An Adorable Mix Dog Breed of Maltese and Shih Tzu

Silky Terrier Grooming and Exercise

silky terrier

Source: spockthedog.com

Grooming a silky terrier puppy as well as a full-grown silky terrier is quite simple if you do it on a regular basis. They are one of the ‘easiest to groom dogs’ when it comes to grooming dogs with straight coats. The silky-haired terrier needs to be brushed daily to keep them free of mats and tangles, using a bristle dog brush.

If you have a busy life and are having a hard time maintaining your long hair, you can keep a short-haired silky terrier. In simpler words just give your terrier a puppy cut every 6 months and you have a short-haired silky terrier.

They need weekly baths and tooth brushing. A regular trip to the groomer to get their ears cleaned and their nails trimmed are also necessary to keep them in the best possible condition.

Silky terrier’s short hair needs combing less frequently and will be at its best even if it’s done just twice a week. Always use a moisturizing shampoo that’s not too hard on their coat and keeps it silky and shiny. 

To keep your silky terrier dog fit, you need to exercise them daily which can be in the form of regular walks or indoor play. You can use a puzzle feeder to keep them busy and as a form of mental stimulation. Socialization and obedience training at an early age is a must to keep them from developing habits that may later prove troublesome.

Use positive reinforcement to train them as they are sensitive and do not respond well to harsh techniques. Their prey drive and barking nature should be worked on, to keep them in check. They have a good memory so make sure you lay out clear rules and teach them the right things because that’s what they’ll remember.

Health

silky terrier

Source: dailypaws.com

The silky Australian terrier is known to be a very healthy breed with a long life span. They do not encounter many health concerns when bred with proper care and caution. Although, there are some genetic issues that can be of concern if the breeding doesn’t meet proper standards or the wrong gene gets passed on.

The most common genetic predisposition in a silky terrier is hypothyroidism which can lead to lethargy and weight gain. 

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